My Booklist

  • Popcorn leaps, popping from the floor

    Of a hot black skillet

    And into my mouth.

    Black words leap,

    Snapping from the white page.

    Rushing into my eyes.

    Sliding into my brain which gobbles them

    The way my tongue and teeth

    Chomp the buttered popcorn

     

    When I have stopped reading,

    Ideas from the words stay stuck

    In my mind, like the sweet

    Fingers long after the popcorn is finished.

     

    I love the book and the look of words

    The weight of ideas popped into my mind

    I love the tracks

    Of new thinking in my mind.

     

    Maya Angelou

NYS ELA Common Core Curriculum

  • Bud, Not Buddy

    by No Author Text Year Published: Average
    It’s 1936, in Flint, Michigan, and when 10-year-old Bud decides to hit the road to find his father, nothing can stop him.
    Comments (-1)
  • The Lightning Thief

    by Rick Riordan Year Published: Average
    After getting expelled from yet another school for yet another clash with mythological monsters only he can see, twelve-year-old Percy Jackson is taken to Camp Half-Blood, where he finally learns the truth about his unique abilities: He is a demigod, half human, half immortal. Even more stunning: His father is the Greek god Poseidon, ruler of the sea, making Percy one of the most powerful demigods alive. There's little time to process this news. All too soon, a cryptic prophecy from the Oracle sends Percy on his first quest, a mission to the Underworld to prevent a war among the gods of Olympus.
    Comments (-1)

Ms. Pride's Favorite Books

  • Cecil the Pet Glacier

    by Matthea Harvey & Giselle Potter Year Published: Average
    An indescribably unique picture book about wanting to be normal, then coming to appreciate being different. Ruby would love to be like everyone else—not easy when you have a tiara-wearing mother and a father who spends his time trimming outrageous topiary. She'd also like to get a nice normal pet, maybe a dog. Then, on a family vacation to Norway, she finds herself adopted by a small, affectionate glacier. How Cecil, as the ice pet is named, proves himself to Ruby—risking his own meltdown—is a story sure to thrill and delight young readers.
    Comments (-1)
  • Desmond and the Very Mean Word

    by Archbishop Desmond Tutu and Douglas Carlton Abrams Year Published: Average
    Based on a true story from Archbishop Desmond Tutu’s childhood in South Africa, Desmond and the Very Mean Word reveals the power of words and the secret of forgiveness. When Desmond takes his new bicycle out for a ride through his neighborhood, his pride and joy turn to hurt and anger when a group of boys shout a very mean word at him. He first responds by shouting an insult, but soon discovers that fighting back with mean words doesn’t make him feel any better. With the help of kindly Father Trevor, Desmond comes to understand his conflicted feelings and see that all people deserve compassion, whether or not they say they are sorry. Brought to vivid life in A. G. Ford’s energetic illustrations, this heartfelt, relatable story conveys timeless wisdom about how to handle bullying and angry feelings, while seeing the good in everyone.
    Comments (-1)
  • Esperanza Rising

    by Pam Munoz Ryan Year Published: Average

    Esperanza thought she'd always live with her family on their ranch in Mexico--she'd always have fancy dresses, a beautiful home, and servants. But a sudden tragedy forces Esperanza and Mama to flee to California during the Great Depression, and to settle in a camp for Mexican farm workers. Esperanza isn't ready for the hard labor, financial struggles, or lack of acceptance she now faces. When their new life is threatened, Esperanza must find a way to rise above her difficult circumstances--Mama's life, and her own, depend on it.

    Comments (-1)
  • I Have the Right to Be a Child

    by Alain Serres Year Published: Easy Reading
    With a very simple text accompanied by rich, vibrant illustrations a young narrator describes what it means to be a child with rights — from the right to food, water and shelter, to the right to go to school, to the right to be free from violence, to the right to breathe clean air, and much more. The book emphasizes that these rights belong to every child on the planet, whether they are “black or white, small or big, rich or poor, born here or somewhere else.” It also makes evident that knowing and talking about these rights are the first steps toward making sure that they are respected. A brief afterword explains that the rights outlined in the book come from the Convention on the Rights of the Child, which was adopted by the UN General Assembly in 1989. The treaty sets out the basic human rights that belong to children all over the world, recognizing that children need special protection since they are more vulnerable than adults. It has been ratified by 193 countries, with the exception of Somalia and the United States. Once a country has ratified the document, they are legally bound to comply with it and to report on their efforts to do so. As a result, some progress has been made, not only in awareness of children’s rights, but also in their implementation. But there are still many countries, wealthy and poor, where children’s basic needs are not being met. To read a summary of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, go to www.unicef.org/crc/files/Rights_overview.pdf.
    Comments (-1)
  • Iqbal

    by Francesco D'Adamo Year Published: Average

    When young Iqbal is sold into slavery at a carpet factory, his arrival changes everything for the other overworked and abused chidren there. It is Iqbal who explains to them that despite their master's promises, he plans on keeping them as his slaves indefinetely. But it is also Iqbal who inspires the other children to look to a future free from toil...and is brave enough to show them how to get there.

    Comments (-1)
  • Monkey Business

    by Wallace Edwards Year Published: Easy Reading

    From a fish opening a "can of worms" to a tap-dancing octopus putting his "best foot forward," these familiar idioms are re-imagined by award-winner Wallace Edwards in hilarious and unexpected ways. To help readers "stay on the ball," the idioms are used in a sentence that accompanies each illustration, and the meaning of each idiom is explained at the end of the book. Every page is so richly illustrated that it is sometimes a challenge to find the hidden monkeys -- some are more easily spotted than others! A playful introduction to idioms, a clever eye-spy book and a gallery of stunning animal portraits, this collection is more fun than a barrel of monkeys!

    Comments (-1)
  • Of Thee I Sing: A Letter to My Daughters

    by Barack Obama Year Published: Average

    In this tender, beautiful letter to his daughters, President Barack Obama has written a moving tribute to thirteen groundbreaking Americans and the ideals that have shaped our nation. From the artistry of Georgia O'Keeffe, to the courage of Jackie Robinson, to the patriotism of George Washington, President Obama sees the traits of these heroes within his own children, and within all of America's children.

    Comments (-1)